Arming PVHS Teachers

A sign outside of a high school that informs you of armed staff on campus.

A sign outside of a high school that informs you of armed staff on campus.

Angel Rodriguez, Journalists

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   The number of school shootings in the U.S. is on the rise. Luckily for us, PVHS students and staff  have not been victim of such events yet, but should our teachers have a way to defend their students and themselves in case of an emergency?

   Currently, 18 states have passed a law allowing public school teachers to carry a concealed firearm with them on school campus. Nevada is not included in those 18 states but should that change? 

   In the past 10 years, there have been an astounding 180 school shootings with surprisingly only 2 of them in Nevada. With that said, would Nevada even need armed teachers? 

   “I think firearms are legal for safety reasons,” says PVHS junior Brenden Loyoko, “but there will always be bad people using a good thing for a bad reason.” On the other hand, Junior Jakob Richardson said, “I see guns used to meaninglessly killing people  more than saving people” but he added “ if the teachers are given the proper training I think it would benefit the security of the school for sure.”

   If you live in Pahrump you more than likely know about Front Sight. This company has offered to give the teachers of PVHS the required training if the law allows armed teachers was said passed.  Dr. Ignatius Piazza, the founder of 

   Front Sight says, “Front Sight will accept training up to three staff members from each school.” Piazza added, “There is evidence that a gun in the hand of a teacher will stop an armed attacker.” 

   Quite honestly I completely agree with Dr. Piazza, Breneden Loyko, and Jakob Richardson. Arming teachers would be absolutely beneficial for the security of the school.

   Even though there has only been 2 school shootings in Nevada, maybe that number can be brought down to zero in the next ten years with zero lives lost. If the law was passed in Nevada, PVHS would have a better chance of not falling victim to a tragedy.